Morgan Housel – The Psychology of Money

Morgan Housel - The Psychology of Money

One of my favorite financial writers, Morgan Housel, is on the Financial Independence Podcast today!

I’m not the one conducting the interview this time though (all is explained in the episode).

Morgan’s insight into how to handle uncertainty, market crashes, and this weird stock boom that we now find ourselves in is invaluable so hope you enjoy it!

Big thanks to Gouri, Morgan, and the Bogleheads for making this happen!

Listen Now

  • Listen on iTunes
  • Stream audio file here
  • Download MP3 by right-clicking here

Highlights

  • Investing lessons from COVID-19
  • Impact of the US presidential election on stocks
  • Why you should plan on the world breaking every ~10 years
  • The most important financial skill and why it’s important
  • How to deal with greed and fear
  • What you can do to get better with money
  • How to use other fields to learn about investing (and the best historical period to learn from)

Show Links

Full Transcript

Coming soon!

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11 comments for “Morgan Housel – The Psychology of Money

  1. Dawn
    September 10, 2020 at 8:01 am

    Really good. Thanks

  2. Patrick
    September 10, 2020 at 8:53 am

    I have done exstensive reading on investing and investing behavior and consider myself very financially literate. I found this interview to be one of the most insightful pieces of information I have come across.

    • Wiktor
      September 10, 2020 at 8:58 am

      Patrick, what are your favorite books on the subject?

      • Tarquin
        September 10, 2020 at 9:13 am

        Hi Wiktor, would be interested in your views on this

    • Warren Q
      September 10, 2020 at 3:12 pm

      I 100% agree Morgan is on of my favorite writers right now.
      I got an Amazon email saying Morgan’s book shipped right before I got the email notifying me about this podcast talk about luck!

  3. Bobbi
    September 10, 2020 at 11:12 am

    Awesome insights that apply to everyone regardless of the current economic climate. Thanks so much!

  4. Carolina
    September 10, 2020 at 1:41 pm

    Nice talk, thank you!

  5. Warren Q
    September 10, 2020 at 3:13 pm

    I 100% agree. Morgan is one of my favorite writers right now.
    I got an Amazon email saying Morgan’s book shipped right before I got the email notifying me about this podcast. Speaking of luck!

  6. Ron Ripley
    September 10, 2020 at 4:15 pm

    You weren’t kidding Brian – really great interview and we appreciate you pursuing the “rights” to play it on your podcast! I am now a Morgan Housel fan for sure…as a lover of investing and fascinated by what makes folks tick – this was gold. From one FI to another, keep up the great work!

  7. Soltist
    September 12, 2020 at 6:06 am

    Interesting. I’ve been interested in WW2 since I was a child and I agree on the era of the wars being an interesting time period. Does anyone know some some books specifically about the economics of the time?

    Besides this, Kershaw’s biography of Hitler also tells much about what was happening at the time. It’s very surprising to see how such a varied democracy fell down in such a short time period. WW1 left the Germans bitter about their fate as a loser, then the Great Depression hit them hard as they were reliant on the loan system between Germany, France and the USA (war reparations). Because of the economic effects, the Germans started desiring and strong leader. The rest is a political scramble in which Hitler became Chancellor and he managed to get more and more power. The rest is history.

    I think the economic recovery of Poland might be interesting to learn about as well. They were kinda the biggest loser in the war, even though they were on the winning side. You could argue that they’re still recovering from the cultural and economic damage caused to them. The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth used to be one of the most culturally and ethnically diverse countries. Yet the past century changed everything with all the ethnic cleansing and what not.

    • Gouri
      September 15, 2020 at 2:48 am

      In response to books on the economics of the time-
      Morgan Housel has referred to “The Great Depression: A Diary” by Benjamin Roth, as one of the most fascinating books he’s ever read, and also the best economics book he’s read. And interestingly, it wasn’t written as a book to be published.

      Excerpt from one of Morgan’s articles on the book:
      “Benjamin Roth, an [Ohio] lawyer, kept a detailed diary from the early 1930s through World War II, observing in detail how the Great Depression affected average people. His son published the diary…”

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